Addicted to Drugs

Brief Description of an article from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Many people do not understand why or how other people become addicted to drugs. It is often mistakenly assumed that drug abusers lack moral principles or willpower and that they could stop using drugs simply by choosing to change their behavior. In reality, drug addiction is a complex disease, and quitting takes more than good intentions or a strong will.

In fact, because drugs change the brain in ways that foster compulsive drug abuse, quitting is difficult, even for those who are ready to do so. Through scientific advances, we know more about how drugs work in the brain than ever, and we also know that drug addiction can be successfully treated to help people stop abusing drugs and lead productive lives. Click for the entire article

What Is Drug Addiction?

Addiction is a chronic, often relapsing brain disease that causes compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences to the addicted individual and to those around him or her. Although the initial decision to take drugs is voluntary for most people, the brain changes that occur over time challenge an addicted person’s self-control and hamper his or her ability to resist intense impulses to take drugs.

The Addicted Brain

Fortunately, Counseling are available to help people counter addiction’s powerful disruptive effects. Research shows that combining addiction Counseling medications with behavioral therapy is the best way to ensure success for most patients. Counseling approaches that are tailored to each patient’s drug abuse patterns and any co-occurring medical, psychiatric, and social problems can lead to sustained recovery and a life without drug abuse. Click for an entire article on NIDA

Accountability Cognitive Skills

Accountability in Cognitive Skills. Why does being accountable for our emotions and behavior require so much effort? In society today the more we get away with reckless and unacceptable behavior the more we continue that behavior.

We trick our minds into accepting the lack of accountability as normal behavior. When our reckless behavior is addressed, we don’t like it. We get angry with everyone that has input in addressing that behavior.

Continue reading “Accountability Cognitive Skills”

Relapse in the Warmer Season

Warm weather is here and life starts feeling easier, right? Well, not always, if you’re in recovery. Recovering people face serious challenges while staying sober during the spring and summer seasons and official holidays. Relapse in the warmer season is avoidable. Spring and summer come with sports games, picnics, barbecues, weddings and celebrations all seem to involve alcohol of some sort. Some of us may run into your old marijuana or drug-loving friends at the beach, pool, or a friend’s party. How do we stay clean and sober over the season when temptation present at all corners?

The warmer season is all about being casual and having fun in the sun. Most of us have a carefree attitude with lower inhibitions. However, we have learned not to be carefree about recovery. No matter where summer fun leads, sobriety and recovery should remain our number-one priority every day — We can still have plenty of sober fun under the sun and catch some rays or waves.

AACS offers tips for staying sober during the spring and summer holidays. We have listed tips to help us navigate both daily lives as well as those special occasions like graduation parties, weddings, and 4th of July parties that all seem to coincide with summer fun.

Here are ten simple suggestion that can help you stay clean and sober during the warmer season. We will be grateful by the end of the season for maintaining our recovery.

  1. Put recovery first
  2. Attend 12-step or self-help meetings
  3. Plan ahead with friend in sobriety
  4. Use the buddy system
  5. Be honest with yourself and others
  6. Plan sober fun
  7. Don’t focus on what you can’t have
  8. Avoid resentment at all times
  9. Volunteer
  10. Call your sponsor daily

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