Expedited Substance Abuse Counselor Training and Certification

Expedited Substance Abuse Counselor Training and Certification
 
1755 The Exchange SE
Suite 245
Atlanta, GA 30339
 
Substance Abuse Counselor Training
Substance Abuse Counselor Training
 
Expedited Substance Abuse Counselor Training and Certification
 
Expedited substance abuse counselor training and certification classes are ongoing on a biweekly and monthly basis.  The only requirement is a High School/GED diploma.
270.0 core educational hours for CADC I/CADC II
180.0 core educational hours for CAC
 
Heroin is killing our children
Heroin is killing our children
Expedited Substance Abuse Counselor Training and Certification
 Class Schedule and Format
 
The course is offered either biweekly on Thursdays or on the first Saturday of every month for a total of 14 sessions.
 
Expedited opportunity for direct supervision and contact hours are available during this course.
 
Enrollment Information and Cost
 Expedited Program Fee: We offer a variety of payment plans, as low as $85.00 per session, to meet individual
budget needs.
 
 A mandatory registration fee of $250 is due on first day of class (this fee includes payment for class textbook).
 
 Clinical supervision is available at the additional cost of $50.00 per hour (or $30.00 per hour when supervision is pre-paid for). For CADC I/CADC II you need 300 clinical supervised hours.
 

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Family Violence Intervention Program Classes – FVIP $30

Family Violence Intervention Program Classes

The groups allow for personal, emotional and psychological development in the areas of responsiveness to feelings of anger, violence and maladaptive reactions. Most adults were not taught how to respond to situations, feelings, and emotions. Our partnership will allow you to learn these new skills rather quickly, so you can communicate with your loved ones in a loving and healthy manner. #FVIP classes are made of gender-specific groups. Each group discusses and deals with issues that are problematic in our daily lives.

Domestic Violence in LGBTQ COmmunities
Family Violence Intervention Program for LGBTQ Families.

It is neither realistic nor possible to completely eliminate anger and violence, therefore, the goal of  #Family Violence Intervention Program classes is to learn how to cope with and express anger and violence in a healthy way. The interventions in each class are designed to build cognitive restructuring of maladaptive thought patterns and behaviors.

Family Violence Intervention Program
Family Violence Intervention Program Classes.

In #FVIP classes, we discuss the difference between anger, hostility, aggression, and violence, so that participants can appropriately define and express their experience. Additionally, the #FVIP classes curriculum is designed to address the effects of anger on the body, behavior, mind and how it can lead to violence. These interactive #FVIP classes include various case studies and scenarios that address specific, anger-inducing situations in order to facilitate group dialogues related to appropriate and healthy responses. Additionally, clients will be challenged to objectively question their initial reactions and consequently reframe it to a healthier perspective.

For additional information on the Georgia Commission on Family Violence, please visit the website at https://gcfv.georgia.gov/

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Behavior Modification for Recovery

 

The importance of change and what it takes to modify our behavior.

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Behavior Modification for Recovery from Alcoholism and drug addiction are primarily brain- and behavior-based psychological disorders that have foundations in neural and biological substrates along with persistent conditioning brought about by repeated behavioral patterns. There exists a strong reciprocal relationship between the mind and body of the addict and alcoholic. Science has revealed a variety of genetic and environmental factors that contribute to our current understanding of addiction and subsequent prevention and treatment approaches. Furthermore, these developments have helped to shape the current societal views of addiction from a moral failing to a health problem. This shift has consequently altered our focus on solutions from punitive measures to therapeutic treatments and preventative education.

Although medications can alleviate many of the unpleasant withdrawal symptoms and side effects associated with substance abuse (along with assisting with some of the deeper, often undiagnosed, psychological phenomena that were being ineffectively self-medicated with the substance of abuse, such as depression, bipolar, and anxiety-related disorders), the need for behavioral modification and self-regulation is essential to long-term recovery and overall well-being.

There are numerous theoretical models which thoroughly outline the development and progression of addiction—virtually all of which posit the necessity for cognitive and behavioral modification. Essentially, it is well-understood, from a variety of perspectives and disciplines which deal with addiction in some capacity, that removing the substance of abuse alone is not effective in ensuring long-term sobriety, in that the underlying causes and conditions that led to the abuse (even in the wake of devastating consequences) must also be addressed and corrected.

 

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The second element necessary of behavior modification for recovery is one of unwavering persistence and dedication to the task. Because the modification of thought and behavioral patterns that have invariably developed over an entire lifetime can take a considerable amount time and energy, a certain level of tenacity and inner determinism to persevere is often required. Along with such a drive comes the need for an attitude of compassion and patience with oneself. Deep and enduring change is neither easy nor quick, and the probability of the recurrence of old behaviors and thoughts in certain familiar contexts is highly likely, if not inevitable. For example, no matter how much one commits to avoiding anger and frustration, given the appropriate circumstances (e.g. traffic, arguing with a loved one, etc.), the feelings are bound to be elicited because of their conditioned nature. The key is to constantly remind oneself of the desire to change the ruminative thinking and habitual responses which have always accompanied such emotional reactions. Compassion is necessary when undergoing this painstaking task. Cultivating this kind and loving relationship with oneself is what is often meant by “parenting oneself,”  or behavior modification for recovery, which is what the process of recovery demands. Moreover, it is important to avoid labels such as “success” and “failure,” and instead respect the evolution of change as you embark upon it. The specific practices and resources one incorporates to assist in this process depend on the nature of treatment and therapeutic services provided. Regardless of the specificities, in light of the difficulty this inner transformation presents to the addict or alcoholic, some form of treatment and support is highly recommended.

For help with treatment classes

For help with DUI arrest and classes