Behavior Modification for Recovery

 

The importance of change and what it takes to modify our behavior.

Behavior Modification for Recovery

Behavior Modification for Recovery from Alcoholism and drug addiction are primarily brain- and behavior-based psychological disorders that have foundations in neural and biological substrates along with persistent conditioning brought about by repeated behavioral patterns. There exists a strong reciprocal relationship between the mind and body of the addict and alcoholic. Science has revealed a variety of genetic and environmental factors that contribute to our current understanding of addiction and subsequent prevention and treatment approaches. Furthermore, these developments have helped to shape the current societal views of addiction from a moral failing to a health problem. This shift has consequently altered our focus on solutions from punitive measures to therapeutic treatments and preventative education.

Although medications can alleviate many of the unpleasant withdrawal symptoms and side effects associated with substance abuse (along with assisting with some of the deeper, often undiagnosed, psychological phenomena that were being ineffectively self-medicated with the substance of abuse, such as depression, bipolar, and anxiety-related disorders), the need for behavioral modification and self-regulation is essential to long-term recovery and overall well-being.

There are numerous theoretical models which thoroughly outline the development and progression of addiction—virtually all of which posit the necessity for cognitive and behavioral modification. Essentially, it is well-understood, from a variety of perspectives and disciplines which deal with addiction in some capacity, that removing the substance of abuse alone is not effective in ensuring long-term sobriety, in that the underlying causes and conditions that led to the abuse (even in the wake of devastating consequences) must also be addressed and corrected.

 

Behavior Modification for Recovery

The second element necessary of behavior modification for recovery is one of unwavering persistence and dedication to the task. Because the modification of thought and behavioral patterns that have invariably developed over an entire lifetime can take a considerable amount time and energy, a certain level of tenacity and inner determinism to persevere is often required. Along with such a drive comes the need for an attitude of compassion and patience with oneself. Deep and enduring change is neither easy nor quick, and the probability of the recurrence of old behaviors and thoughts in certain familiar contexts is highly likely, if not inevitable. For example, no matter how much one commits to avoiding anger and frustration, given the appropriate circumstances (e.g. traffic, arguing with a loved one, etc.), the feelings are bound to be elicited because of their conditioned nature. The key is to constantly remind oneself of the desire to change the ruminative thinking and habitual responses which have always accompanied such emotional reactions. Compassion is necessary when undergoing this painstaking task. Cultivating this kind and loving relationship with oneself is what is often meant by “parenting oneself,”  or behavior modification for recovery, which is what the process of recovery demands. Moreover, it is important to avoid labels such as “success” and “failure,” and instead respect the evolution of change as you embark upon it. The specific practices and resources one incorporates to assist in this process depend on the nature of treatment and therapeutic services provided. Regardless of the specificities, in light of the difficulty this inner transformation presents to the addict or alcoholic, some form of treatment and support is highly recommended.

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Marijuana can’t help PTSD and anxiety

Marijuana can’t help PTSD and anxiety

Marijuana can’t help PTSD and anxiety

At AACS Atlanta, we deal with many veterans who have been using marijuana to deal with their PTSD and anxiety issues.  The article below discusses that marijuana can’t help PTSD and anxiety.  For a long time, people have used marijuana as an alternative temporary and a quick fix to get relief from PTSD and anxiety. Although we don’t advocate for medication dependance to deal with PTSD, we encourage our clients to seek  help  from mental health professionals to begin working on cognitive restructuring immediately.

New treatment modalities and best practices have shown  learning how to cope with stress, traumatic experiences and PTSD are the healthiest methods to gain a life long skill to deal with these uncomfortable thoughts and feelings.

There are several studies that indicate marijuana can’t help PTSD or anxiety.  Most people experience a brief period of relief only to return to a higher state of anxiety. PTSD can be addressed in several therapeutic models. The editorial published on July 10, 2015 by The Gazette identifies adverse affects of THC dependance for PTSD.

Marijuana can’t help PTSD and anxiety

If you or a loved one is depending on marijuana to deal with PTSD or anxiety, please visit our site for immediate help or to schedule a free consultation. 

Please click on the link below for the full editorial.

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Click for article on self-medicating with marijuana

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Anger Management Classes

Anger Management Classes are the newest trend in the US and around the world.

For many years anger issues have been viewed as a male problem. The truth is men and women get angry equally. Couples, family members,  and even victims play an equal part in unhealthy relationships.  Untreated anger may lead to self-destructive behavior, loss of trust, respect, and even uncontrollable rage, which can result in violence.

Children and adolescents develop anger issues than can result aggression and bullying. These may be learned behaviors or a result of early childhood experiences. Juvenile judicial officers, behaviorists, schools, and families enroll their loved ones in anger management classes to improve their quality of life and establish healthy relationships.

History of Anger Management

Anger management classes are designed to encourage introspection and a person-centered approach allows individuals to self-identify underlying causes. Participating in anger management classes is an excellent way to treat individuals who suffer from these symptoms. Treatment modalities utilize techniques that are geared to building self-esteem, boundaries, and appropriate assertive confrontation.

At AACS Atlanta, anger management classes are offered for several tracks. Anger management classes

Anger Management Classes

Anger management techniques can be practiced on a daily basis. Mindfulness, relaxation, and breathing techniques are some of the most simple ways to avoid anger.