Accountability Cognitive Skills

//Accountability Cognitive Skills

Accountability Cognitive Skills

Accountability in Cognitive Skills

Accountability in Cognitive Skills.  Why does being accountable for our emotions and behavior require so much effort? In society today the more we get away with reckless and unacceptable behavior the more we continue that behavior.

We trick our mind into accepting the lack of accountability as normal behavior. When our reckless behavior is addressed, we don’t like it. We get angry with everyone that has input in addressing that behavior. Rarely do we OWN our reckless behavior, rarely do we hold ourselves accountable, and although we know better, we rarely think our consequences are fair.

Accountability in Cognitive Skills may just change your life!

Consequences come in many forms. The most rejected consequence is when we are arrested and the negative consequences that follow.  Most often we are surprised when our behavior is addressed from a criminal aspect, thinking “I only had three beers, it was just one molly”, or I only fight when people won’t leave me alone”.  Reckless behavior, such as addiction, depression, anger, domestic violence, compulsive shoplifting, and theft, anxiety, not only affects the person engaging in that behavior, it also affects the community.  The community includes family, friends, neighbors, co-workers, and all other citizens within.

Accountability in Cognitive Skills may just change your life!

When we are engaged in negative behavior as a community it has to be addressed and when we accept ownership of our behavior it is at that point we are open to accountability. Once we accept accountability for our reckless behavior we understand the consequences we know to expect are inevitable. We are able to embrace the corrective behavior skills presented and if practiced we have the ability to make better decisions in our life. We learn to adapt from the learned behavior and our environmental influences, we learn to and conform to positive thinking and not respond to negative thinking or negative emotions as we understand that would contribute to a cycle of chaos in our lives and no accountability.

 

Sabrina Davis, CIT

AACS ATLANTA – May 28, 2018

By | 2018-05-28T19:11:33+00:00 May 28th, 2018|Recent Posts|0 Comments

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